How much is GOP leadership willing to rewrite the rules to block Donald Trump?

By KTTH | March 23, 2016
trump

The first rule of the Republican Convention is there are no rules. But Tim Carney, senior political columnist for the Washington Examiner, wonders how much Republican leadership is willing to bend this year in order to block Donald Trump from winning the nomination.

Carney told “Armstrong and Getty” that rules at the convention can change every four years. For instance, leadership changed the rules in 2012 explicitly to prevent Ron Paul from being even offered for nomination so that there wasn’t a floor fight, he said.

“Republican Party leadership basically has the power to literally do whatever it wants at the convention,” Carney said. “The constraining factor is how much will it seem like a coup that will dissolve the party. My answer is it depends on exactly what they do.

“The only constraining on the party leadership would be how much are they willing to bend, rewrite or ignore the rules in order to block Donald Trump?” he added. “And if they think it would be a lot, then they will say Ok we’re better with Trump than with a total coup of the party.”

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