Limbaugh: Sane Swiss reject $25 minimum wage

By Neal McNamara | May 20, 2014
Swityerland Referedum

One day your country is sailing along just fine without a minimum wage, the next day a bunch of zany activists try to install a $25 minimum wage.

What happens? The voters overwhelmingly say no, saving your country from assured economic ruin.

That’s what happened recently in Switzerland, one of the few countries in Europe – including Germany, Norway, and Sweden – without a minimum wage. More than three-quarters of voters said “no” to a $25 minimum wage, what would’ve been the highest in the world.

“In a move that would give president Obama wealth redistribution nightmares for months, a whopping 77 percent of Swiss voters rejected an initiative for a national minimum wage,” KTTH host Rush Limbaugh commented.

“How dare Switzerland not pretend supply and demand doesn’t matter and one can circumvent the laws of common sense and enforce employment and wages by diktat? Simple: Government ministers have fought against the measure and insisted it will damage the economy, running small companies out of business and making it harder for young people to find employment.”

In fact, Rush is right. Swiss economic minister Johann Schneider-Ammann told the Christian Science Monitor, “A minimum wage won’t stop poverty. This system would be counterproductive.”

“If you get a job in Switzerland, you are essentially agreeing that you’re going to work. It is a great concept. It is a great concept worth emulating. We’ll have to find the guy that came with this. Can you imagine how mad Obama’s going to get when he finds out that Switzerland voted down by 77 percent a minimum wage or $25 bucks and hour? And then when he learned there isn’t a minimum wage? Would you want to be the person that has to tell him that?” Limbaugh said.

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